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Thread: Fishing Rigs - Illustrated

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    Default Fishing Rigs - Illustrated

    General: This sticky thread will contain posts from members related to the subject "Fishing Rigs - Illustrated". Each contribution will be titled to provide the primary subject matter contained in that post. These posts will come from threads contained elsewhere on this website and will be indexed and a link provided (see directly below this paragraph) by title, so that you can go directly to the subject of interest by clicking on the link. A link to the original thread will also be provided so you may visit the full discussion on each particular title.
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    Subject Title: HOW TO TROUT FISH, SLIM'S WAY... (28May08)
    Author: Slim to None
    Go to Title: http://carolinaskiffowner.com/showpo...37&postcount=2
    Go to Original Thread: http://www.carolinaskiffowner.com/showthread.php?t=2825

    Subject Title: CAPT. MICK'S FISHING RIGS (12Apr08)
    Author: Capt. Mick
    Go to Title: http://carolinaskiffowner.com/showpo...39&postcount=3
    Go to Original Thread: http://www.carolinaskiffowner.com/showthread.php?t=2092&highlight=capt+rigs

    Subject Title: Blue Cat Dropper Loop Rig (2Jun08) (post untitled)
    Author: cathooker
    Go to Post: http://carolinaskiffowner.com/showpo...41&postcount=4
    Go to Original Thread: New (to me) catfishing technique http://carolinaskiffowner.com/showthread.php?t=2778

    Subject Title: HARRY'S GULP BAIT FLOUNDER RIG (4Jun08)
    Author: Harry
    Go to Title: http://carolinaskiffowner.com/showpo...34&postcount=5
    Go to Original Thread: http://carolinaskiffowner.com/showthread.php?t=2924

    Subject Title: REDFISH TECHNIQUES AND TACKLE (22Jul08)
    Aughor: Redfish
    Go to Title: http://www.carolinaskiffowner.com/sh...94&postcount=6
    Go to Original Thread: http://www.carolinaskiffowner.com/showthread.php?t=3413
    Last edited by Dave; 09-10-2008 at 12:53 PM.

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    HOW TO CATCH TROUT, SLIM'S WAY...

    Author: Slim to None

    I've had some friends ask me recently about how I fish for trout and reds, so I thought I would get all crazy and post some pics of the rigs and baits I use to make it easy to explain. I certaintly didn't create all these rigs, rather just tried every other style out there and found these works best in the waters I fish.

    Trout: Soft plastics, soft plastics, soft plastics. Mainly unscented Zoom Super Flukes in clear water. Colors I catch most trout with are white, blue pearl, and salt & pepper. Match the bait in the water, if its small mullet go with salt & pepper or white. More glass minnows or small pinfish, maybe a green back or pumpkin or throw in the pearl. The waters I fish are crystal clear, so the scented Gulps aren't needed. The big trout will hit off the sight and motion of the bait. You can add Lunker sauce scent gel if the bite is slow, or try the Gulps. The pinfish destroy Gulps on most of my trout flats, so it gets expensive. If you fish darker water you can go to the more brighter colors like nuclear chicken or pink works surprisingly good! Gulps catch fish when the water isn't as clear and they are feeding off scent instead of sight. Rig on a bait keeper hook and add a bullet weight if needed. Tie hook to 15-25 lbs flourocarbon using a loop knot. Either a canoeman knot or a rapala loop knot will work. This is very important in clear water. Trout see very well and the loop knot gives the bait very life like movement. Rig the bait weedless and it will pull right through the grass. I use 15lbs test 4lbs dia Power pro tied with a uni to uni knot to the leader on a Bass Pro IM6 7' ultra light and a pflueger trion reel. Long casts are the key, getting the bait far away from the boat. Work the bait through the grass keeping it up and "swimming" for a bit then drop into the grass like a natural bait would to hide. Repeat working grass flats concentrating on the pot holes of sand or natural rocky bottom close to deeper water and shallow grass. The larger number of trout will be out in deeper grass when the water warms during summer months. These trout are usually good sized slot fish. But, the big trout seem to be in the shallow grass early in the morning where there is hard bottom, either oyster, rock, or natural hard bottom and then move to deeper cooler water when the sun comes up. They dont move far though, trout are lazy fish. The main thing to remember about big trout is that they are minnow feeders. You must present them with something that immitates a small baitfish. Hard plastic baits and top water work great on 2-3' grass for the big trout. Talk about excitement, trout and top water! Use a Mirrorlure or a rapala or similar plug in whatever color bait is around that day. Suspending plugs get the bait deeper during the winter months when trout are in deep creeks. The water temp will be your biggest guide to what depths to fish once the sun comes up and gets the shallows hot. Big trout will seek 76-80 degrees in my area. Any hotter and I start looking for deeper cooler water. I'll include live bait fishing for trout when I post about redfish.
    Pics:
    The colors I use most:

    The keeper hook and bullet weight, notice the loop knot keeps the weight off the plastic and allows the bait to stay a couple inches off the bottom and grass.

    Slide plastic on keeper stake.

    Push plastic up and hook through belly of bait and out the back.

    Push hook back into the back making it weedless.

    Here's my favorate and most productive hard baits. And again rig with loop knot. It's that important!!!

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    CAPT. MICK'S FISHING RIGS

    Author: Capt. Mick

    Redfish and Trout Rig


    Okay - I always keep this rig on one of my rods. Day in and day out it catches fish. This set up is weedless so throw it in the grass and in the oyster rocks. Retrieve it slowly, bouncing it off the bottom using your rod tip. The weedless set up is Mustad Power lock Plus 1/8 oz. 3 to a pack $7.00 at Bug-Em-Bait Tackle in Wilmington.

    Float Rig with Gitzem Head and DOA Shrimp Body


    Another great rig. I use the popping cork, the one that rattles does not work as good. I use a Spr 30#swivel. 18" of 20#Flourocarbon, 3/4 oz Gitzem Pink weedless head. DOA or Gulp shrimp. Notice how the head is put on so that the weedless mono is hid in the legs of the shrimp.

    Fish this by jerking it side to side. Test it in the water next to your boat and watch how it swims from side to side. Deadly in clear water, early in the morning.

    Dock Rig for Reds


    30# Spro swivel, 18" of 25# mono, 2oz weight, #2 or #4 Live Bait hook, and green bead.

    The reason this set up is with a 2oz. weight is to throw it under the dock. All the way under. If you are not losing rigs you are not throwing it far enough under. You will feel the pinfish nibbleing at your minnow or pogie. Keep it still. When they stop nibbeling the Redfish is near. Keep a tight drag and get him out from under the dock quick.

    Planer with Pig tail


    #1 or #2 planer, 38# Stainless wire, 30# Ball Bearing Snap swivel

    Connect the wire the the planer using a haywire twist. Then twist the BallBearing Snap Swivel onto the wire. The length between the planer and the swivel should be about 6 inches.

    Connect 30 foot of 25# mono leader to a #1 Clark spoon using a loop knot. Connect the other end to a barrel swivel, then to the pig tail. The Ball Bearing Swivel will spin with the lure and keep your lines from twisting and it provides superior action on the lure. Fish this at 6 knots for Spanish Mackeral or Bonito.

    King Mackeral Rig for dead bait


    30# Spro Swivel, 3 feet of 38# Tobacco wire, Bluewater Candy skirt with Mylar, 1/4 oz Pink Hank Brown jig Head, #4 treble hooks

    Cut 12" off the wire and haywire twist one treble hook onto it. Take the remaining wire and haywire twist the swivel on one end and the jighead on the other end. Haywire twist the first treble to the eye of the jighead leaving 4 or 5 inches between the hooks.

    When fishing hook the jighead through the lips of your cigar minnow pulling the jighead where it is completely straight. Now attach the treble hook to the back of the cigar minnow and move him side to side to make sure he swims. Pull this deep at idle speed.

    To use this rig for live bait. Replace the front jig head with a #4 treble hook. Hook him lightly with one hook. Leave just enough slack in the wire so that you can move him side to side like he is swimming. If the wire is to tight he will just spin when you pull him. Remember to squeeze him at the top to break his back bone. This makes him swim alot better.


    Little Haystacks Redfish Caught with dock rig and finger mullet


    Small Spring King caught with king rig and Cigar Minnow

    This rig works for Kings, Mahi, and Cobia. Hope all this helps. Let me know if you want something else.

    Rigged Pink Pirate Plug


    This has got to be the greatest new innovation in dead bait trolling with ballyhoo. This rig out fished my IIlanders 10 to 1 easily. Sorry I forgot to post a pic of them earlier. This rig should be in any serious fast trollers arsenal.

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    BLUE CAT DROPPER LOOP RIG

    Author: cathooker

    Cheez and me fish together a lot and we use basically the same drop type rig. I found a way to do it and save on swivels. This has not presented us with any problems and we have landed blues up to 48 lbs with it. It is easy and fast to tie also.

    I use flourocarbon leader or Cajun Red extra abrasion resistant. I use no smaller than a 50 lb test leader. Here is how I do it. First I tie a swivel to the main line. Then I take a length of leader of approximately 24 to 30 inches and tie this to the swivel. Next I tie a a surgeons loop in the bottom of the leader. This is to hook the sinker to. I then go up adout half way between the bottom loop and the swivel and tie another surgeons loop. This is to tie the hook to. You can play with this and use different lengths of leader to make your hook loop longer or shorter. For bank type fishing I would use a no roll type sinker and for boat fishing I use bank sinkers. Get a short length of 10 or 12 lb test mono , again you can vary the length to suit your needs. On one end tie a small snap swivel and on the other end tie whatever type or size sinker that you want. You hook the end with the small snap swivel to the bottom surgeon loop of the main leader. This will allow you to easily break off the sinker if it should hang up. I tie the hook on by simply passing the middle leader loop thru the eye of the hook and over the hook and sinch it back on to itself. Here's what it looks like. We have put hundreds of pounds of catfish in our boat using this type rig.




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    HARRY'S GULP BAIT FLOUNDER RIG

    Author: Harry

    Here's my attempt of rigging and how I use gulp bait for Flounder, Weakfish, Stripers,....etc.

    This is mainly geared to flounder fishing but can be used for others as well


    For this rig to be most effective it must be used in 15' of water or less. I suppose it could be used deeper if the current is not strong.

    Since your fishing shallow water the lighter the jig head the better IMO.


    I use a 6.5' fast action spinning rod and load the reel with 15-20 lb power pro. My choice is moss green.

    At the end I tip it with a shot of 20-25 lb floro line, but mono will work too. I choose to join these two line together with a knot called the "Albright Special". Some use a barrel swivel. With the knot you can reel the jig head all the way to the last eye in your rod when moving to a different location too.



    No matter how you join them, it's my opinion that you must use something other than the braided line to attach to the jig. This is the business end of the rig, and braid while SUPER strong and zero stretch, doesn't not hold up well to nicks & abrasions that these toothy critters can dish out. The short piece of floro will not stretch when only using a 16" piece.

    Next I prefer a little clip tied to the end of the floro. These clips are made called "Breakaway fast links".
    Some tie direct but with constant changing of weighted jigs, & changing conditions, I find this fast and easy.


    Simply clip on the desired jig head.
    I love the "owner" type jigs, as the hooks are super sharp and have a wide gap for the body of the bait. Plus they have a nice lead barb to hold the bait on the jig.
    I bought a mold to make my own, but the barb stunk on them and the hooks were hard to find with the right combination.


    Hold the bait (these happen to be 3" shrimp) next to the jig with the snout of the shrimp next to the base of the lead head. See where the hook should exit the back and try to make your hook exit this spot.

    Slide the bait onto the point of the hook and you must help it around the bend.


    If all went well it should look like this


    If you went to far down towards the tail it will sit too high and not look natural. Believe me when I say the properly rigged bait will out fish a poor rigging job every time.
    If you went too far it will look like this.


    If this happens simply back the bait off and push the hook through the back a little closer to the head of the bait.

    I've tried the 2" and 4" and while both work, it's the 3" that I like best. The 2" is not only shorter but has a skinny body & the jigs I use have the hook exiting near the tail.
    The 4" the hook is too far FWD and you miss a lot of fish. I've looked and cannot find longer shank hooks.

    The rigging method also works for gulp swimming mullet, jerk shad, and a variety of other soft body baits.


    OK,
    So your all rigged up and ready to fish.

    Once you locate your fishing grounds ( if drift fishing) simply fish it as you normally would a bucktail. If you are drifting with the current this is good and will present a natural presentation of the bait being washed out by the tide.
    Drop down until you reach bottom and with short twitches of the wrist keep this going. Try to avoid LONG sweeping motions and stay in contact with the bottom at all times, hopping the bait across the bottom and bouncing it 4-5 " off the bottom. Flounder tend to inhale bait and expel excess water trough the gills. They will also "stalk" prey while "walking" on there side fins. I've seen this !!!

    Sometimes the are very finicky feeders. I call these fish "tail suckers" they take the bait from the tail and try to dis-able the prey. When they are in this mode it is important to feed line back to them as soon as a strike or nibble is detected.

    If I feel a strike and miss, I immediately open my bail and drop back to the fish. I'll close the bail and raise the rod tip slowly if I feel weight it's usually a safe bet he has bitten up on the bait and I set the hook.

    If you are drifting and the wind has got you and pushing you against the tide, or your anchored or bank fishing, always remember the fish are usually "facing" the tide waiting for prey to come his way.
    In this case I've caught fish by casting " upstream" no matter which direction the boat it being blown, and simply retrieve my jig at the same speed as the tide while twitching along. You may have to reel quite fast to keep pace, depending on the wind and tide speed.
    If you choose to just bounce your bait at the mercy of the wind and are going against the tide, you are basically pulling your bait from the fish facing away from the bait, across his tail towards his head. you CAN catch this way, but not consistent.

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    REDFISH TECHNIQUES AND TACKLE

    Author: Redfish

    Redfish (Red Drum) are a ubiquitous species along our whole Eastern and Gulf seaboard, so I am hoping this will be a great discussion, too, and might provide some information that will help other Skiff owners catch a few of my personal favorite species of fish. Here are my tried and true techniques:

    I use a variety of terminal tackle to catch reds—both with live (or “natural”) bait and using artificials. Typically the “offerings” change with the seasons, but I always start off my terminal rig with a good-quality black swivel, followed by a short piece (about 18”) of monofilament leader (usually 30 lb test in a low-vis color). To that, I tie on whatever the “offering” will be. I use a uni-knot exclusively to tie the swivel to my line and to tie one end of the leader to the swivel and the other end to the business (i.e., hook) end of the rig.

    As noted, offerings will change with the season. If it’s fall or winter, live or natural bait works best (usually “live” shrimp, for me, but mud minnows, fiddler crabs, cut bait also will catch fish). I typically fish the bait right on the bottom in deep, shell or rocky holes in coastal creeks. I hook my bait directly onto a jig-head, so the built-in weight of the jig-head will do the job of carrying the bait to the bottom. This is a deadly rig for late-fall and winter reds in my area, and it will often pick up an assortment of other tasty fish (trout, drum, sheepshead, etc.) if they are present.

    If you like artificial bait, you can substitute a curly-tail 3-5” soft plastic on the jig-head or one of the newer “realistic” artificials such as Berkley Gulp. Greens, whites, and yellow/red combo colors work well. Bump this slowly along the bottom of the same deeper, hard-bottomed holes for best results in the fall and winter. In the warmer months, this approach will also work along the rocky or shell-laden points and submerged bars. Learning how to “bump” the bait along without getting hung-up is the key to this approach. Redfish don’t feed much on soft, muddy bottom, so if you ain’t getting hung-up every now and then, then you are not fishing where you will find a redfish.

    Gold spoons and shallow diving plugs become the bait of choice during the hot months. (Tie this “offering” to the same swivel and leader mentioned above.) Weedless gold spoons work the best over the oyster bars and along the grass lines, but reds do get wise to the spoons and sometimes become reluctant as the season wears on. I use a trolling motor to work the bank and bars, sometimes casting several times to the same spot to thoroughly work an area. If it’s calm, and especially in the early morning, top-water plugs work too. Reds are generally bottom-searchers, but a red will bust a well-presented top-water plug as hard as any fish.

    Finally, there is the popping cork method. This rig will catch fish in the summer along the grass lines and over the bars. It works well on windy days when it is hard to use the trolling motor or on days you just want to fish with little effort (anchor up, try a spot, move on down). It is also a kid-friendly setup that works well with the youngsters and novice fishers. I use the Cajun Thunder slip corks with enough leader tied to the submerged end to keep my bait just off the bottom. I typically tie about two foot of the same test line as I use for leaders under the rig and tie on a jig-head. Again, natural baits are deadly when fished along the grass and over the covered bars, but the soft plastics and Gulp-type baits will also catch fish. I try to position my boat in a location where the tide will “sweep” my terminal rig over a bar or along a rocky or shell-bottomed area near the grass line. Cast it out, let it move along the targeted spot, reel it in and try again. Give it a little “pop” every now and then to wake up Grandpa Red if he’s resting. Only problem with this rig in the summer (or in my area, anyway) is catfish. Saltwater catfish can eat up a pile of bait in a hurry during the summer, and I despise fooling with them. They are not like the freshwater variety in that they are not generally eatable and will cause a very painful and nasty “sting” if you are hit by a horn. Don’t ever let a kid handle a saltwater catfish.

    These are my methods. To save space, I've posted only one picuture with a number of the typical offernings I have discussed. Hope some of you other Skiffers can add to the discussion.

    Note from 1stSgtUSMCRet: Be sure and visit Redfish's original thread http://www.carolinaskiffowner.com/showthread.php?t=3413 for more techniques and tackle contributions by other members for catching this popular fish! Also see related topic "Red Fish Equipment" for a discussion on rod and reel choices for Redfish: http://www.carolinaskiffowner.com/showthread.php?t=3355

    Last edited by Dave; 09-10-2008 at 12:59 PM.

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